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Novel package shrinks multilayer memory units

A Sharp Microelectronics product story
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Edited by the Electronicstalk editorial team Nov 29, 2004

Sharp Microelectronics reckons it has developed a major improvement on the classic die-stacking method for manufacturing multilayer memory units.

Sharp Microelectronics reckons it has developed a major improvement on the classic die-stacking method for manufacturing multilayer memory units.

Instead of always having to adjust production in line with the number of layers, with the "system in package" (SIP) method developed by Sharp multilayer mass storage devices are built up like modules from individual SIP units.

These units, which are only 0.5mm high, contain two stacked cellular layers.

The memory is driven by standardised pins in the peripherals of the SIP units.

Thanks to this standardisation several units can be stacked to form a mass memory.

Memory chips having a total of up to six layers (three SIP units with two layers each) and a total height of 1.5mm can now be built in this way.

Manufacturers of mobile terminal devices such as mobile phones and PDAs will benefit most from this SIP technology because they can now design-in powerful system LSIs without requiring any additional space.

A partner of Sharp Microelectronics has developed a suitable baseband chip module especially for the SIP system.

This makes it possible to combine memory chips and processors in extremely compact units.

There are current plans for packages with five cellular layers and a total height of 1.4mm built from two SIP units plus a baseband module.

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